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Firefighting

To Boldly Go!

Chris Tobin

I’ve often said that the hardest step a fireman takes on the fire ground is a step back. Everything we do is hard charging, lights and sirens, full speed ahead. We don’t like hearing “evacuate the building”. That being said, the hardest step a fireman takes on the training ground is the first one. That proverbial leap of faith every new instructor has ever taken. It can seem like an insurmountable wall of self doubt laid with bricks of insecurity. Simply put, it’s fear of the unknown. You wanna break a fireman’s ego? Put them in front of their peers, it’s sink or swim and there’s no lifeguard on duty.

   Ask any instructor in the fire service and they’ll be able to tell you without hesitation the first time they were in front of a classroom or that company drill they ran. I can tell you mine was not by choice and rather improvised. It was in 2006 while in a chiefs meeting on my first day at a new station. He asked what skills were my weak points and I said “ropes and knots without a doubt” and the response I got was completely unexpected. He said… 

“Well that’s perfect we have a spot open on the Heavy Rescue and training at 1pm. I want you to do today’s training on basic knots” 

I didn’t know what had happened but I knew I had about 3 hours to come up with a PowerPoint presentation and to figure out how I was supposed to convince anyone I was proficient at ropes and knots. I don’t know how many bowlines, clove hitches and figure eights one can tie in three hours but it felt like the world record. In the end the Chiefs idea was brilliant, I threw together a quick presentation and came out with more confidence of knots than I ever had. It not only refreshed a skill for me but also broke the ice with the crew members. Even though I had put on the class it naturally turned into one big informal training with all of us throwing in tips and practicing knots together.

   Now looking back on my first company drill was no big deal but at the time I was pretty nervous It was overcoming moments like that which gave me the confidence to step out on the circuit.This seems to be a recurring theme with anyone who wants to get started but isn’t quite sure of themselves to take the leap. They have the drive, the ambition, the passion and knowledge but there’s that little bit of doubt holding them back.

It’s always the same reasons. 

“I don’t have enough experience”
“ I’m not a good speaker”
“I’m not on a big Department”
“I don’t have anything to offer” 

   In reality none of those are the real issue. The main reason is the simple fact we don’t know how our peers will perceive us. With every action comes reaction and everything you say will be critiqued by your audience. Every instructor out there knows criticism comes with the territory and if you can’t handle it then find something else, you won’t last. Not everyone will agree with your material and they don’t have to. What fun would that be?

   All that aside the bottom line remains. There’s 1.2 million American Firefighters and they all need training. Every firefighter has 3 obligations once they raise their right hand. To serve, to learn and to pass on. 2/3rds of that philosophy goes back into the job the other third goes to those we serve. That’s how the fire service continuously stays ahead in our mission to save lives and property. The truth is we’re all instructors one way or another. Even the newest members of a Dept have something to offer on a company level. 

   So I challenge you with this question. What knowledge or skill have you passed on recently? If you can’t readily answer that then you’re doing the job a great disservice. There is no excuse to sit idly by while a new generation of firefighters seek knowledge. We are in the age of declining fire, now more than ever experience of our trade is at the highest premium. Now is your time to get out there and share what you know. Whether it’s a social media post, an FDIC presentation or anything in between today is your day.

What are you waiting for?

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