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Firefighting

The Senior Man

Chris Tobin

So, when I first decided to write this article I wanted to make it something different. Any quick Google search of “The Senior Man” will get you multiple well written articles on the subject. I thought to myself how I could make that happen instead of just re-writing about the same subject. Then it hit me, why not just ask them? Instead of me telling you about what it means to be a Senior Man of a company I’d let them tell me in their own words. It would be a unique perspective. You want to know the importance of the Senior Man? Let’s hear what they had to say.

Before we get to that, let’s take a moment to cover what the Senior Man is all about. For the most part you can go into any firehouse in America where firefighters are working and ask “Who’s the Senior Man?”. Chances are you’ll be greeted by an older, more experienced, jovial individual who, just by their body language, projects some sort of confidence or command presence. Don’t let the term fool you, women are just as likely to fill this role as men. The bottom line is no matter where you go, every Firefighter you ask can without hesitation tell you who the senior man is on their company. That should go to show you the value of these individuals. These are the members with decades of experience or have by far, the most time on amongst the crew. They’ve “been there done that seen everything” but are yet humbled and seek only to pass on what they know, not brag, boast or self-promote. They lack the typical hubris of far too many in the Fire Service. Its these defining qualities that any recognized Senior Man exudes. It’s the epitome of the informal leader, there’s no promotional exam or study material for this position. It’s bestowed upon you by your peers. 

This role has many hats but no rank, just respect. It’s the “go to” person for newer members with questions. When conflicts arise, a good Senior Man will quickly step in before the Officer must. This keeping of the balance is also why they’re respected by the officers just as much. It’s a go between role between the crew and officer, a critical bridge of communication. The crew members will go to the Senior Man before the Officer and the Officer will go to the Senior Man to address issues on an informal basis. Another more practical aspect of the senior man is their level of actual firefighting experience. One can say “you follow an Officer’s orders into danger, but it’s the Senior Man who you are actually following into it”. These members provide a safety net of past experiences to the younger, less seasoned of the crew. It’s a built in over watch for when the crew is doing work that involves a high level of risk. Therefore, smart officers will pair senior members with younger ones on the fire ground. It’s a synergistic luxury if you have the means to do so. So that about covers what the senior man is all about, now let’s see what the actual senior men have to say.

Ask any old-timer, the time flies by on this job, how do you want to be remembered?

“There is definitely a thing called leadership from the bottom. It means showing up early every shift, and being able to play whatever position they need you in that day, be it senior man, acting officer, acting engineer, etc. Being a senior man means keeping an eye on newer folks, and mentoring them, not just talking about how much time on you have and what you have done. It also means having your finger on the pulse of the firehouse, and taking care of little problems before they become big ones. This mainly has to do with personnel relations, sometimes it means having sit downs with people before the officer has to, because once they get involved things have to be on paper, and that creates more tension for everyone. And finally, I would say it means setting a good example because you want to. Ask any old-timer, the time flies by on this job, how do you want to be remembered?” 
Jeremiah Herderich
Denver Fire Department
Firefighter First Grade.
19 years in the Fire Service 

“Never think you know it all, ’cause you don’t. If you get to that point, give the reins to someone else.”

“The senior man is not a “test” position, it’s a position that kinda just happens to the most senior guy on truck. You get the title by being “that  guy.” A lot of times you may not want the title but end up with it anyway.  If you are “that guy” you need to embrace the title and position. Be the teacher to the other guys, be the go to guy on your rig. The senior man should know the rig as good as, if not better, than the officer.  He should be a good station guy, do your share of house duties but be able to delegate out as well.  He should be the liaison to the officers, the go between for the other guys. He should be able to weed out non-essential BS that the officer doesn’t need to worry about. But most, the senior man needs to be a “Fireman” not just an employee or pension thief or yard breather or whatever name you give. Be true to the profession and always be a student. Never think you know it all, ‘cause you don’t. If you get to that point give the reins to someone else.” 
Anonymous 
Chicago Fire Dept
Firefighter
22 years in the Fire Service

“I believe that being a senior fireman on the Memphis Fire Department means setting the example, passing on my experience, and leading from the front.”

“Being the senior man means being the go-to guy, being the one to teach and instill knowledge and skills to the newer firefighters. Personally, I don’t usually tell lesser experienced guys to take task, I take it upon myself to complete the task and set an example in hopes that they follow suit. Whenever possible, I try to include less experienced firefighters and use teachable moments to share my experience and wisdom that I have gained on the job. Rather than watch a new firefighter fail at a new task, I want to assure that they have what it takes to be successful and know that they were given the same opportunities I was given as a probie. In short, I believe that being a senior fireman on the Memphis Fire
Department means setting the example, passing on my experience, and leading from the front.”

Hugh Doyle
Memphis Fire Dept
Engine 17 
Firefighter 
15 years in the Fire Service

“To have the knowledge of knowing when something’s not right on the fireground. You’re the one the newer members look up to and approach with questions.”

“It takes dedication on the job, as well as having a passion for the job. The willingness to share their knowledge that they have acquired over the years. They are willing to take a newer, younger firefighter under their wing and show them the ropes. To have the knowledge of knowing when something’s not right on the fire ground. You’re the one the newer members look up to and approach with questions. The biggest thing when it comes to being a senior man is training and the willingness to learn.”
Ron Schroader
St Louis Fire Dept
Rescue Squad 2
Firefighter
29 years in the Fire Service

“I work to make my platoon to be the strongest in the firehouse. That, through my example, is the platoon that’s full of pride for the company, the department, and the fire service.”

“I strive every shift to be the senior guy that says, “Hey gang, let’s go over this. Let me show you how it’s done and why we do it this way.” and have a strong training experience. I work to make my platoon to be the strongest in the firehouse. That, through my example, is the platoon that’s full of pride; for the company, the department, and the fire service. The “go to” crew when something needs doing, whether in the station or on the fireground. When members transfer out to busier houses, I want them prepared for as much as possible in their new assignment, so their new company says, “Hey, this kid has their stuff together. We’re lucky to have them.” Most of all, I want them to become the senior firefighter in their house and be an example for the younger firefighters that come to them. That’s my take on being the senior firefighter.”
Ray Clothier
Philadelphia Fire Department
Firefighter
21 years in the Fire Service

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